Wait, What Just Happened? Montessori in the White House

Last Wednesday, December 10, my Montessori feed (Facebook, email, etc.) blew up about something called the White House Summit on Early Education and something about $15 million for public Montessori programs.

OK, you got my attention—but what exactly happened? Here’s some context:

First, you need to know that President Obama has been making a big deal about Early Childhood Education (ECE in the education world) since at least his State of the Union speech in 2013 (full videoECE talking points). In his 2014 address, Obama set the goal of a public-private partnership to greatly expand and improve publicly funded ECE. At last week’s White House Summit on Early Education, Obama fulfilled that goal, announcing $750 million in public support and $330 million in private funding through Invest In Us, a major initiative of the First Five Years Fund (itself a project of the Ounce of Prevention Fund—welcome to the world of high-level philanthropy).

More attention and money for ECE is good news for children almost no matter what, given the quality and availability of what’s offered now. But we know that having Montessori in the mix would be even better news for children and good for education in general. And that’s what’s exciting about what happened at the summit. Part of that private $330 million is a $15 million commitment from Trust For Learning, a collaborative fund supporting Montessori education and a project of the McCall-KulakFamily Foundation and the McTeague Catalyst Fund, which organized and funded the Montessori Leaders Collaborative (previously on TMO), which brought together the leaders of the Montessori movement in the U.S. including AMS and AMI-USA, helped launch the Montessori Census, sponsored the State Public Policy Project, and more (TMO here and here).

So on Wednesday, Stephanie Miller, Executive Director of Trust For Learning (along with a team of founding partners, foundation partners, board members, etc.) was at the Summit, a six hour invitation only gathering at the White House with lunch in the Indian Treaty Room, breakouts, and a 30 minute address from the President.  So when we talk about Montessori being at the table, in the room with the people spending money and making decisions at the highest levels, that’s what we’re talking about.

And about that $15 million: That’s a 5 year commitment to programs supported by various partner foundations “aligned with a central Trust For Learning strategy for bringing high quality public Montessori to more children in this country, especially the ones who need it most.”  That means it will be spent locally, and the key, according to Miller, is to “build momentum at the local and state levels.”* This is where Montessorians everywhere can  join state organizations, talk to local leaders, and get involved.  There’s a movement on!

* More about the Trust for Learning and how to connect:

Trust for Learning is a collaborative fund of partners, all of whom are committed to bringing public Montessori and developmentally appropriate approaches to more children in this country.  The Trust is doing this work through a collective national strategy, and does not accept unsolicited proposals at this point.  That said, the Trust always welcomes news and inquiries from the field through the website at www.trustforlearning.org or by contacting the Executive Director, Stephanie Miller, at miller@trustforlearning.org.

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4 responses to “Wait, What Just Happened? Montessori in the White House

  1. This is fantastic news! I had seen other posts about it on Facebook but your article explains it very clearly so now I understand the significance of the funding. I’m in England so it doesn’t affect us directly but I’m sure our government will take more notice once the scheme has been proven in the US, and hopefully it will filter down to our Early Years providers too. Thanks again for writing this article. I look forward to reading more as the scheme progresses.

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  2. How do I access the money?

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  3. I think this is good news….however there are public Montessori schools in name only. School districts much realize that not all Montessori schools are teaching Montessori. I left a public montessori school because of this very reason. I couldn’t live the lie.

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    • The Montessori Observer

      Susan,

      Thanks for the comment. Part of the work is raising, maintaining, and communicating the standards. For this to happen, there will need to be some burying of hatchets but also some long hard looks at selves…

      Like

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